Appendix 5: IT Service Coordination

  1. Developing the IT Service Portfolio and the IT Service Catalog
  2. List of Common Good Services at the University of Minnesota

Appendix 5A – Developing the IT Service Portfolio and the IT Service Catalog

The UNLV IT Master Plan recommends improving IT Service Coordination at UNLV through the development of both an IT Service Portfolio and an IT Service Catalog. Together the portfolio and the catalog will provide the campus with a clear picture of what IT services exist, what new IT services are being planned, how to access the services, and who is responsible for providing the services. Below find details about the IT Service Portfolio and the IT Service Catalog, how they would be developed and maintained, as well as examples of how they would be used and why they are needed.

The IT Service Portfolio

Functions of an IT Service Portfolio
  • Serves as a tool for managing service delivery from initial implementation to retirement
  • Is used as a reference when making decisions regarding staffing and resource allocation
  • Provides a baseline for technology governance decisions that relate to technology services
Contents of an IT Service Portfolio
  • A complete listing of existing technology services and includes:
    • Services that are highly visible to the customer (e.g., establishing an email account)
    • Service components customers may not be aware of that are part of the services they use (e.g., offsite storage copies of the back-up to the email system)
  • High-level information about services including:
    • Current list of existing services
    • Data about new services under consideration
    • Planning details related to service improvement initiatives
    • Schedules for decommissioning existing services
  • Service level agreements (SLAs) between University units who work together to provide a complex service (e.g., MyUNLV)
  • Information about third-party services that augment services provided by the University (e.g., data center services from System Computing Services)
Responsibilities for Managing UNLV’s IT Service Portfolio
Individual or Group IT Service Portfolio Responsibilities
Chief Information Officer (CIO)
  • In collaboration with TAC:
    • Initiate development of the portfolio
    • Oversee ongoing maintenance of the portfolio
  • Engage governance groups to ensure campus-wide inclusion of IT services in the portfolio
Technology Advisory Committee (TAC)
  • In collaboration with CIO:
    • Initiate development of the portfolio
    • Oversee ongoing maintenance of the portfolio
  • Approve changes to the portfolio
  • Conduct periodic reviews of the portfolio to ensure the IT services continue to meet individual and campus needs
Technology Review Board (TRB)
  • Recommend changes to the portfolio to the TAC

The Service Catalog

Functions of an IT Service Catalog
  • Indicates which strategic goal or business need is supported by a particular IT service
  • Identifies which campus personnel and/or unit are responsible for delivering each service listed in the catalog
  • Provides customers with the means of understanding what IT services are available and how to access them
  • Enables and automates the IT service request process
Contents of an IT Service Catalog
  • A list of all current services presented in a manner that enables users to easily browse, select, and initiate requests for services
  • An external facing presence that describes services intended for customers. Each service within the catalog would include information such as:
    • A description of the service
    • Timeframes to fulfill a service request once initiated
    • Any related service level agreements for fulfilling the service
    • Who is entitled to request/view the service
    • Costs (if any)
    • How to request the service
    • Escalation points and key contacts
    • Hours of service availability
  • An internal facing component that helps service providers respond to service requests. Each service within the catalog would include information such as:
    • Documentation for the procedures and processes required for completing service requests
    • Detailed technical attributes of the requirements for delivering the service
    • A list of all systems needed to fulfill the request
    • All service level agreements between all units responsible for offering complex systems
    • List of contacts supporting each component of the service
Responsibilities for Managing UNLV’s IT Service Catalog
Individual or Group IT Service Portfolio Responsibilities
Chief Information Officer
  • In collaboration with the TAC:
    • Initiate development of the catalog
    • Oversee ongoing maintenance of the catalog
  • Facilitate periodic service catalog updates with service owners
Technology Advisory Committee
  • In collaboration with the TRB
    • Initiate development of the catalog
    • Oversee ongoing maintenance of the catalog
  • Approve major changes to the catalog
  • Review statistics and assess feedback related to the catalog
Technology Review Board
  • Review requests from campus constituents about changes in IT services
  • Recommend new services, changing services and services that need to be retired

Example of the Type of Information Found in an IT Service Catalog

The scenario - A new campus employee needs wireless access.

The external facing portion of the catalog would provide the employee information such as:

  • Who to contact to get the access
  • If there is a fee for the service
  • Who can access the service
  • What transmission speeds to expect
  • How long establishing an account should take
  • When wireless access is available
  • Links to documentation on how to configure and use the service

The internal facing portion of the catalog would include information that the unit(s) providing the service would require, such as:

  • A map of current wireless coverage
  • Details about setting up the authentication process for the customer
  • Questions to ask to determine if the customer’s devices (e.g., computer, tablet, phone, etc.) will support wireless connectivity
  • Who to contact for more details about authentication, campus hot spots, etc.

Creating Service Level Agreements (SLAs)

Some of the more complex IT services at UNLV will require agreements between two or more UNLV or external entities who, together, provide the complete service (e.g., various services offered by MyUNLV involve staff from Student Affairs, Controllers Office, Decision Support, OIT, and System Computing Services). To ensure all units involved in providing a service are aware of the expectations of their units, Service Level Agreements that set forth formal terms for service arrangements need to be developed. SLAs will differ by service but will contain information such as:

  • Description of the service to be provided by each unit
  • Number and type of staff resources and amount of time required for the service
  • Service availability expectations
  • Response time expectations for service disruptions
  • Communication channels and issue escalation procedures
  • Assessment mechanisms to evaluate the effectiveness of the agreement
  • Penalties and contract back-out options

Adding, Changing, or Eliminating IT Services

A process for requesting changes to the IT Service Portfolio will need to be developed. The process should include steps that:

  • Assess need and impact of new service or change to or retirement of existing service
  • Determine the scope of the service
  • Identify the delivery methods
  • Map the interdependencies with other services in the catalog
  • Decide upon centralized, decentralized, outsourced, or hybrid delivery
  • Define resources required to support new or changed services
  • Communication with the stakeholders most impacted by the service throughout the process

An Example of Current UNLV IT Services that Would Benefit from Campus Coordination

OIT is currently working on defining a set of services that would benefit greatly from a structured, campus-wide approach to creating IT Services associated with a full-service data center. The services include:

  • Server hosting at OIT data center facilities
  • Application hosting on virtualized servers managed by OIT
  • Provisioning data storage and related services (e.g., backup) associated with the applications on OIT hosted servers

 Other units on campus offer similar services (e.g., Supercomputer Center) or related services (e.g., Library). The coordination between the units is done informally and makes it difficult for campus clients who need the services to know which unit offers which services.

Furthermore, OIT only offers one type of data storage for the servers it supports. To better serve campus customers and keeps costs as low as possible, data storage services will need to be differentiated by factors such as:

  • Type of access - shared or not shared, publicly available or not
  • Amount of access - use every day, access once a month, rarely viewed archival records
  • Security requirements - normal, high, classified
  • Special considerations - data cannot be stored out of the country; data cannot be stored in the “cloud”

UNLV should determine which units are best at storing which types of data (e.g., Supercomputing Center for classified data, Library for institutional archives) and provide campus clients with a coordinated set of storage options.


Appendix 5B – List of Common Good Services at the University of Minnesota

The University of Minnesota uses a logical screening process for determining which services are best provisioned by central IT and which services are best provisioned by distributed IT. Below is a list of the Common Goods Services offered by the OIT at the University of Minnesota.

Common Goods Services offered by the OIT at the University of Minnesota

Common Goods Services offered by the OIT at the University of Minnesota